about

Introduction

Hi! My name is Jeff Clarke, and jeffkclarke.com is my blog! Thanks for visiting!

I invite you to take some time to relax, read, reflect, and recenter. There’s no need to rush. Take a seat, take a breath, and stay awhile.

A Little Background

My wife Karen and I have been happily married for 22 years and live in Brantford, Ontario. We enjoy nature walks, traveling, reading, and spending time with friends.

My ecclesiastical journey began in the Salvation Army tradition where the basis of my Christian faith was established as a child and adolescent. During my later teenage years, I became involved in a local Pentecostal (PAONL) congregation in my hometown of Springdale, Newfoundland.

After moving to Ontario in 1995, I enrolled in the Bachelor of Theology program (pastoral ministries major) at Master’s College and Seminary (Peterborough, Ontario). After completing my B.Th. (honors), I enrolled in the Master of Theological Studies program at McMaster Divinity College (McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario), and graduated in 2001.

Later, I received ordination with the Western Ontario District of the Pentecostal Assembles of Canada and served a number of congregations in a variety of leadership positions.

I am the former Senior Editor with ChristianWeek – Canada’s leading online source of Christian news and commentary – and still have a column there, Jesus (Re)Centered, which I invite you to visit.

I also spend much of my time doing what I love – public speaking, blogging, and writing for a variety of print and online publications. A sample of my work can be found on my writing page.

Speaking and Writing Engagements

If you are interested in having me write a guest post for your blog, review your book, write an article or book review for an online/print publication, or to speak at your church, conference or workshop, please visit my Contact Page for more information. I will respond as quickly as possible.

Blog BackStory

Sometimes, in order to learn about something, we have to (un)learn some or all of the things we thought we knew about that something.

In our pursuit of Christ, there will be moments when we’ll have to (un)learn what we thought we knew about Jesus in the process of relearning about the real Jesus who lay behind our presuppositions, prejudices and preconceived ideas.

In our pursuit of Christ, whether it be a new pursuit or somewhere along the journey, we must consistently seek to find the space and time to center and (re)center Jesus into the very heart of who we are, so that he can become the central theme that informs and shapes all we do.

So, whether you have yet to center your life in Jesus for the first time or need to (re)center your life once again, welcome home. You’ve come to the right place.

Purpose Statement for Jesus (Re)Centered

Jesus reveals what God is really like, what the church should look like, and what every person can be like.

Jesus reveals what God is really like – God looks like Jesus.

  • If we want to know what God is like, we look to Jesus – who is the Word of God in flesh, the image of the invisible God, the radiance of God’s glory, and the exact representation of God’s being. Jesus is God’s enfleshed icon. He was God in sandals, who walked the earth as the pardon of God.
  • Jesus perfectly reveals what the nature and character of God has always been like in a way no one else ever has or will.
  • Jesus lies at the center of God’s self-revelation.
  • If we want to know what God is like we look to the fullest revelation of God’s self – Jesus.
  • God looks like Jesus. We follow a Jesus-looking God.

Jesus reveals what the church should look like – the church should look like Jesus.

  • The church should always center its identity, activity and witness in Jesus who defines the life of the gathered community – the church.
  • This gathered community of Jesus-followers should be a people who reflect, imitate and live the life of Jesus in the world through the enablement of the Holy Spirit.

Jesus reveals what every person can be like – every person can be like Jesus.

  • He reveals what human beings were always meant to be like.
  • He reveals what it looks like when we are free to be our true selves – people made in the image of God – sons and daughters of God who have been called to imitate the only perfect image of God, Jesus Christ.

Therefore, by reorienting our focus on Jesus as God’s enfleshed icon and placing him at the center of our lives as God’s image-bearers, this reorientation will inspire new questions about God, resulting in new conversations, leading to new stories –

  • for individuals
  • within community
  • in the world

Jesus reveals what God is really like, what the church should look like, and what every person can be like.

We will explore this theme through – 

  • articles
  • book reviews and recommendations
  • videos
  • interviews
  • quotes
  • guest posts from friends

After twenty years of reading, studying, writing, and trying to live this stuff out myself, I believe I’m in a position to offer some guidance as we together attempt to navigate our way through the craziness of life.

There are no quick fixes here.

However, by daily (Re)centering our whole heart, mind, soul and strength in the person, life and teachings of Jesus, we will begin a journey towards a life with God and others that we may have believed probable, but never dreamed possible.

What to Expect

I will normally publish two new posts each week.

To ensure you never miss my latest posts, you can subscribe via email.

Top Posts

Here are a few of my top posts:

A King and His Kingdom: Relearning the Story of Jesus From the Ground Up

The Holy Spirit as the Catalyst for a Jesus-Shaped Life

Inspired – But NOT Equal: The Bible is the Witness, NOT the Word

A Call to Allow Jesus Back into Christianity Until Christianity Begins to Look Like Jesus

Following Jesus is More Than Applying Principles

Following Jesus is Not About the Verses 

Entertainment Fatigue: Are People Growing Tired of the Church’s Glitzy Stage?

God is Waiting on the Outside

Learning to Walk in the Darkness with Jesus

Redefining Holiness Jesus-Style

Putting the World Back Into Christianity

Theological Influences

Some of my favourite authors are those who have made indelible impressions on how and what I believe, live in and see the world. They include, but are certainly not limited to, Clark Pinnock, Stanley Grenz, Greg Boyd, Alan Hirsch, Leonard Sweet, Amos Yong, Roger Olson, Scot McKnight, Rachel Held Evans, Brian Zahnd, Bruxy Cavey, David Fitch, and N.T. Wright.

I’ve also come to deeply appreciate a host of other writers who focus on how a Christian witness in the way of Jesus should look and sound like in a post-Christian culture.

Check out the blogs I follow for additional writers whose message I respect and resonate with. Each of these people are trustworthy and are on the cutting-edge of Christian-based research and service.

To learn a little more about my journey, please read through this post – We Can Be So Right and Still Be So Wrong: My Theological Journey from Certainty to Discovery.

Writing Influences and Affiliations

I thoroughly enjoy and appreciate the work of Jeff Goins. I am a member of his Tribe Writers program – which I highly recommend!

I’m also an associate member of The Word Guild and am the 2012 winner of the Canadian Christian Writing Award in the category of article-review for my piece, What’s the Plan? The Adjustment Bureau and the Question of Free Will.

Publications

Here are a few of my Publications.

Education

Bachelor of Theology (B.Th) – Master’s College & Seminary, Peterborough, Ontario

Master of Theological Studies (M.T.S) – McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario

Resources I use on jeffkclarke.com

I use the Get Noticed theme for WordPress. Simply the best!

I use Blue Host services as the hosting company. Highly recommended!

I use Goad Media Group from Fergus, Ontario, for all of my photo work, as well as their design services for my header, logo and social media profiles.

I use MailChimp for my email subscription information and design.

I use Poll Daddy for all of my surveys.

I use Vault Press to back-up my blog.

I use Disqus to help gather and organize the comment section on my blog.

I use WordSwag and Canva to design my post and social media graphics.

I use Google Analytics for statistical collection.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

  • This is an excellent post! I’m watching this happen before my very eyes. I would add one more item: the middle ground between religious dogma and dualism is shrinking rapidly. Christians are quickly polarizing into two categories, the “religious right”, who is getting more and more defensive and aggressive. And, the “liberal Christians”, who continually chip away at foundational doctrine.

    Society is becoming more and more aggressive against the “religious right”, who are being branded as hateful, intolerant, prejudiced, ignorant and delusional. In turn, conservative Christians have become more and more aggressive and defensive in their fight, allying themselves with unlikely allies – such as a political party, and becoming less and less Christ-like in their behavior.

    By contrast, “progressive”, “emergent”, “liberal”, or “modern” Christians seem to side more often with atheists, humanists and agnostics than with fundamentalist Christians – creating internal fighting over specific issues that even further alienate non-believers. More and more Christians seems to be running to this camp in order to avoid the negativity associated with fundamentalism.

    In the meantime, those in the middle – like myself – who believe that Christianity is about being Christ to the world, not forcing our beliefs on others OR minimizing the glory of God and the Word, have become increasingly silent and noticeably invisible. Therefore, as we become either fiery evangelists or intellectual theologians, we now suddenly notices that nobody really cares what we believe. What’s worse, the up and coming generation is unimpressed with rhetoric – they believe in what they can see, feel and touch.

    At what point do we stop trying to figure out who’s right and who’s wrong and get back to work?